Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important

Originally published 19 December on the Biomed Central Network.

Dementia is the name of a group of progressive diseases that affect cognition and other crucial functions of the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Age is the main risk factor; there is a change of 1 in 15 at the age of 65, increasing to 1 in 3 for those over 85.

As our world population rapidly ages, there are a growing number of people who develop dementia. Research showed that in 2015, there was one new case of dementia somewhere in the world every three seconds. This is four times as much than new cases of HIV/Aids. There is currently no cure for dementia.

The impact of the disease is huge. First of all on the individual, who may step by step lose the grip on his or her life. Then for the family, who are in most of the world the overwhelming majority of those who care for a person with dementia, and finally for society, that has to deal with growing group of people seriously in need for care and support. Continue reading “Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important”

A good decade

Rebekah Churchyard, 27, speaks about her relationship with her Grandfather living with dementia, and her passion for new research as a member of the World Young Leaders in Dementia (WYLD).

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Rebekah with her grandfather in Ontario, Canada.

When you’re fourteen years old, there’s a lot going on. Dealing with fluctuating hormones, emerging personalities and high school doesn’t leave time for much else. I was fourteen in 2003 when my Grandma first told us that my Grandpa was diagnosed with ‘semantic dementia’. She carefully explained that this is a special type of cognitive disorder where he would gradually lose the ability to do things like plan, make decisions and talk.

My Grandpa was a well-known teacher in Fergus, Ontario, Canada. His career path was one of the two stories he would always tell; “Did you know I was a teacher? It’s funny because I never wanted to be a teacher…”, he would say.

To generate extra income for their retirement, my grandparents operated a Christmas Tree Farm. They become well known and loved community figures. Grandpa would spend his days on his tractor in the fields, pruning and baling trees. They had planned to travel in their retirement as a reward for decades of hard work. We knew things would change the day he put water where oil is supposed to go in his chainsaw. It was scary for my Grandma.

My Grandma did a wonderful job accessing support and resources available to her, especially from the Waterloo-Wellington Alzheimer’s Society. My Grandpa did not enjoy attending Day Programs and Grandma hired personal support workers or asked family and friends to come stay with him. He would regularly greet guests and say with a sigh, “You know my brain’s no good anymore”. At first, I responded with a dismissive yet reassuring “I still love you”. Continue reading “A good decade”