“Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly

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On 23 May 2018, Alzheimer’s Disease International brought together government delegates, civil society, students and importantly, people living with dementia and carers, in the Palais des Nations in Geneva, for our official side-event to the 71st World Health Assembly (WHA71).

Mobilising Society: Inspiration for national responses to dementia was a particularly significant event for dementia advocacy and the advancement of dementia on the global agenda, as it was the only event at the WHA this year dedicated to highlighting dementia as a global health challenge. It also marked two important occasions: first year anniversary of WHO’s Global action plan on the public health to dementia 2017-2025, and of ADI’s new report: From plan to impact: Progress towards targets of the Global plan on dementia 2017-2025. Continue reading ““Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly”

Support in Oman

My own personal experience of dementia began when my mother seemed to forget where she had put her things. Initially, we as a family assumed that this was simply a normal part of ageing, but gradually she started forgetting where she was and could not recognize the people around her, often repeating questions that we had already answered.

It was at this stage we realized that this was not a normal part of ageing, so we took her to various doctors for consultations, and she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Dementia changed her personality completely, and we didn’t know what to do or how best to support her. It was and still is hard witnessing her decline. I would spend the whole day watching her walk from one room to another, not knowing what she wanted.

She didn’t want people to do things for her because throughout her life, she was someone who was highly organized both in her personal and professional life. She trained as a teacher, becoming a Headmistress and finally an Inspector. Her personal life was one of refinement in her duties to her family and society. She was softly spoken, articulate, forgiving, and always finding good in others, seldom criticizing people; instead often invoking Allah to guide that individual. Continue reading “Support in Oman”

Finding strength through support groups

Anat

Alzheimer’s Association of Israel, or EMDA, is a non-profit organization founded by family members of people living with dementia, which aims to support these families. One of the services offered are caregiver support groups. Through the groups, carers can access information on the disease and how to deal with the health and social care systems.

The group sessions also provide an opportunity for caregivers to share their innermost thoughts and emotions in a supporting and understanding setting, receiving encouragement and drawing strength from one another. EMDA currently operates around 50 support groups throughout Israel that meet once a month, led by social workers or trained volunteers.

I attend meetings in Petah-Tikva. My father was diagnosed with dementia around three years ago. When it started, before his medication was balanced, I felt lost. I was looking for answers – how do I cope with this? What should I say? How should I respond? How does this affect my personal and family life?

I was looking for answers online and that’s when I came across EMDA’s support groups, who invited me to a meeting. It felt like I got to the right place at the right time. I learned how to accept this situation, how to take in any moment I had with my father, even when some moments were very difficult. There were also times, unfortunately only a few, when I could say: that was fun. I cherish these moments.

My father passed away 5 months ago. Yesterday I attended another support group meeting. I came, for the second time since my father’s passing, in order to feel a sense of closure. The first time was right after he passed away and my mother and youngest son came with me. I wanted them to share their feelings and to meet the people who were there with me for almost three years.

I first felt closure when my mother, overwhelmed with emotions, shared her point of view as a spouse of someone with dementia. My son, 18 years-old, had a strong bond with his grandfather. Despite my father’s disease and the deterioration in his condition in the last years, their relationship hasn’t ceased.

Yesterday, I personally felt a sense of closure and thanked the leaders of the support group who were there for me during this difficult time of my life. I wish to thank the leaders of the support group of the group in Petah-Tikva, especially Ruthie and Ilana, who were always there for me.


By Anat Aviv

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Contact your national Alzheimer association for details of support groups available in your area.