“Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly

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On 23 May 2018, Alzheimer’s Disease International brought together government delegates, civil society, students and importantly, people living with dementia and carers, in the Palais des Nations in Geneva, for our official side-event to the 71st World Health Assembly (WHA71).

Mobilising Society: Inspiration for national responses to dementia was a particularly significant event for dementia advocacy and the advancement of dementia on the global agenda, as it was the only event at the WHA this year dedicated to highlighting dementia as a global health challenge. It also marked two important occasions: first year anniversary of WHO’s Global action plan on the public health to dementia 2017-2025, and of ADI’s new report: From plan to impact: Progress towards targets of the Global plan on dementia 2017-2025. Continue reading ““Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly”

Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important

Originally published 19 December on the Biomed Central Network.

Dementia is the name of a group of progressive diseases that affect cognition and other crucial functions of the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Age is the main risk factor; there is a change of 1 in 15 at the age of 65, increasing to 1 in 3 for those over 85.

As our world population rapidly ages, there are a growing number of people who develop dementia. Research showed that in 2015, there was one new case of dementia somewhere in the world every three seconds. This is four times as much than new cases of HIV/Aids. There is currently no cure for dementia.

The impact of the disease is huge. First of all on the individual, who may step by step lose the grip on his or her life. Then for the family, who are in most of the world the overwhelming majority of those who care for a person with dementia, and finally for society, that has to deal with growing group of people seriously in need for care and support. Continue reading “Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important”

Member profile: Cuba

WAM 2013

By 2030 Cuba is predicted to have the highest proportion of older adults in any Latin American country. Today around 19% of the population is aged over 60, but in just 15 years’ time this will rise to 30%. Cuba is a middle income country, but has health indicators similar to those in high income countries, and a life expectancy at birth of 78 years.

As a result of the rapid aging of the Cuban population, it is estimated that the number of people living with dementia, currently standing at around 150,000, is expected to double by the year 2030. During the next 30 years, we expect there will be a tenfold increase in the demand for long-term care for people living with dementia.

The Cuban Section on Alzheimer’s Disease, in Spanish Seccion Cubana de Alzheimer (SCUAL), was founded in April 1996 and its main objectives have been to give information about dementia and educate family members and professionals, as well as to improve medical care for people living with dementia. In 2000, SCUAL became a member of ADI.

Over the past 8 years, SCUAL have participated in a national program to assist people who are living with a disability, and to promote early diagnosis of dementia and risk reduction programmes. To date, more than 40,000 people over the age of 65 have taken part. The programme also helps to support families and training for health professionals. SCUAL collaborated to develop an intervention program called ‘Helping carers to care’, which provides basic education about dementia and specific training on managing behaviours.

SCUAL also participates in the work of the 10/66 Dementia Research Project, a network of over 100 active researchers from more than 30 low and middle income countries who are studying the prevalence and impact of dementia. In Cuba, more than 3,000 participants have been interviewed so far. SCUAL is now supporting a new project by the 10/66 team, to help understand changes in prevalence and incidence over a 10 year timeframe. The project also focuses on the social impact of dementia and how best to identify underlying risk factors and implement care packages.

The Cuban’s National Dementia Strategy has been developed by SCUAL in partnership with the Ministry of Public Health, working together with researchers from several fields and with families and caregivers of people living with dementia. The plan has recommended that the strategy focus on increasing awareness, developing support services, promoting early diagnosis and risk reduction, quality assessment and implementing good clinical practice guidelines. It also asserts that there should be an increase in the availability of specialists in primary healthcare and in investment into dementia research.

SCUAL undertakes a wide variety of activities to help improve awareness about dementia in Cuba, including an annual conference and a campaign for World Alzheimer’s Month and the World Alzheimer Report, including an annual Memory Walk on September 21, World Alzheimer’s Day.

In 2011, Cuba was also the venue of the Iberoamerican Congress on Alzheimer’s Disease, one of ADI’s regional meetings, where 500 attendances from Latin America, Spain and other countries came together to discuss how to improve the lives of people with dementia in the region.


By Juan de Llibre Rodriguez, President of SCUAL

Creating a Dementia Friendly India

Over 4 million people are living with dementia in India and this figure is expected to double every twenty years. Here at Alzheimer’s and Related Disorders Society of India (ARDSI), we’ve been attempting to define what a Dementia Friendly Community (DFC) might look like here, using workshops to get people talking about ways we can help implement these programmes.

We’ve so far conducted five workshops across India, in Trivandrum, Chennai, Bengaluru, New Delhi and Cochin, and were pleased to welcome 200 participants from all walks of life, including family carers, health and social care professionals and the general public. The workshops encouraged participants to identify the challenges associated with setting up DFCs, and ways we can overcome the barriers.  Lots of topics were discussed, but there were some key points which emerged from the session.

Working with the government and other partners

Everyone was very enthusiastic about working with the government and other partners, but there was a concern about how to go about it, given that dementia is unfortunately still a low priority for the government. India does not yet have a national dementia plan, despite the strong, evidence-based recommendations of ARDSI’s Dementia India Report (2010). We believe partnership is a strong cornerstone for success, so we discussed how local collaborations would be equally important among both governmental and non-governmental agencies to help maximise the impact of DFCs.

Using DFCs to raise awareness of dementia

Our estimates show that more than 60% of people living with dementia in India have never been diagnosed. Without a formal diagnosis, it is very difficult to educate and provide information to families to help support the person living with dementia, especially with regard to care skills. First and foremost, it is vital that we spread the message that dementia is not a normal part of ageing, and that more needs to be done to support people living with the disease. Creating awareness among a range of sections of society was identified as one of the most important factors in creating DFCs, especially amongst community level workers, social care and health professionals, to strengthen the current health system in India. A multidisciplinary approach is needed, offering robust care plans. It is our hope that by creating a ‘Dementia Friends’ style programme, we will educate the public on how best to support people living with dementia.

The banyan tree

Having an easily recognizable symbol for dementia friendliness is really important, so during the workshop it was suggested that we should adopt the banyan tree as the symbol for India. It is the national tree of India, and is associated in Indian culture with wisdom and ageing due to its longevity.

Moving forward

In a country like India, we felt it was important that a DFC scheme should include service development as an essential component. Supporting people living with dementia and their families throughout the dementia journey is really important, and there is much we need to improve. Over the past few decades, there have been big changes in the traditional family structures, more women now going out to work means there is an increased demand for external support services. Community level solutions which help respond to this issue and support families are also needed.

So what might a more dementia friendly India look like? Our aim is to develop communities that recognise dementia as medical condition and to be able to support people living with dementia and families, working within networks and partnerships to achieve these goals.

We would like to thank ARDSI Chennai Chapter, Nightingales Medical Trust, Bangalore, organizers of 5th International Conference on elder dignity and abuse, Centre for Gerontological Studies Thiruvananthapuram, India; 17th Asia Pacific Regional Conference of ADI, New Delhi and World Psychiatric Association Regional Congress, Cochin 2015 for facilitating these workshops.


By Sudhir Kumar and Babu Varghese

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