“Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly

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On 23 May 2018, Alzheimer’s Disease International brought together government delegates, civil society, students and importantly, people living with dementia and carers, in the Palais des Nations in Geneva, for our official side-event to the 71st World Health Assembly (WHA71).

Mobilising Society: Inspiration for national responses to dementia was a particularly significant event for dementia advocacy and the advancement of dementia on the global agenda, as it was the only event at the WHA this year dedicated to highlighting dementia as a global health challenge. It also marked two important occasions: first year anniversary of WHO’s Global action plan on the public health to dementia 2017-2025, and of ADI’s new report: From plan to impact: Progress towards targets of the Global plan on dementia 2017-2025. Continue reading ““Progress can only happen when there is close collaboration”: ADI at the 71st World Health Assembly”

Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important

Originally published 19 December on the Biomed Central Network.

Dementia is the name of a group of progressive diseases that affect cognition and other crucial functions of the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Age is the main risk factor; there is a change of 1 in 15 at the age of 65, increasing to 1 in 3 for those over 85.

As our world population rapidly ages, there are a growing number of people who develop dementia. Research showed that in 2015, there was one new case of dementia somewhere in the world every three seconds. This is four times as much than new cases of HIV/Aids. There is currently no cure for dementia.

The impact of the disease is huge. First of all on the individual, who may step by step lose the grip on his or her life. Then for the family, who are in most of the world the overwhelming majority of those who care for a person with dementia, and finally for society, that has to deal with growing group of people seriously in need for care and support. Continue reading “Why a Global Action Plan on dementia is so important”

Healthcare is a human right

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On Saturday 5 December, patients from across the world will join together to celebrate Patient Solidarity Day and declare that healthcare is a human right.

Leading patients’ groups from six continents will host a range of events to raise awareness among the public and will urge decision-makers to respect, protect and fulfil patients’ rights at every level of care. Events will include marches, free health screenings and meetings with ministers to change perspectives around health and improve the lives of patients.

A call to action

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The World Health Organization states that every person has ‘the right to the highest attainable standard of health’. This is not always put into practice. Many patients are unaware of their right to the healthcare they need, and many healthcare providers – from governments to frontline care – fail to fulfil their duty of providing adequate care.

It is time for patients and providers to recognise that healthcare is a human right. This right is protected by the International Human Rights Framework, a body of international law that outlines and upholds the basic rights of every person. This Patient Solidarity Day, patients will stand up for the healthcare they require and remind healthcare providers of their responsibilities at every level.

Kawaldip Sehmi, CEO of IAPO, said:

‘All of us should have access to the healthcare we need: good quality, affordable care without fear of discrimination. Healthcare is a human right for all. We call on individuals, organizations and institutions to ensure that health systems are designed and services delivered to meet the needs of patients.’

Patient Solidarity Day was created by the Morris Moses Foundation in 2011 and has steadily grown since. Last year’s event, coordinated by IAPO, marked the first year as a global campaign and saw 80 organizations from 32 countries take part. This year’s theme continues the legacy of previous years by raising awareness around the rights of patients and placing them at the centre of healthcare.


 

Guest post from the International Alliance of Patients’ Organizations (IAPO)

Find background information, photos, ideas for activities, free resources and much more about Patient Solidarity Day at www.patientsolidarityday.org.